P.S. 6 Lillie D. Blake

An Insideschools pick
45 EAST 81 STREET
MANHATTAN NY 10028 Map
Phone: (212) 737-9774
Website: Click here
Admissions: Neighborhood school
Principal: Lauren Fontana
Neighborhood: Upper East Side
District: 2
Grade range: PK-5
Number of full-day PK seats: 40
Extended PK hours offered: N/A
Zoned
Full Day
School-based pre-k

What's special:

Strong academics, good facilities and involved parents

The downside:

Some teachers want more opportunities to try out new ideas

InsideSchools Review

Our review:

Just off Park Avenue, less than two blocks from the Metropolitan Museum of Art, PS 6 has a strong writing program, a thoughtful approach to math and devoted parents, many of whom easily could afford private school.

There is plenty of excitement in classes and kids seem to be interested in their work, whether it’s playing a telling-time memory game, writing political essays or painting clay butterflies. 

The quality of student writing is very high. From the earliest grades, children learn to write with a voice. Even kindergartners write persuasive essays. For example, one child told classmates why it’s important to cross the street carefully. First-graders put together multi-media presentations—narrated slideshows—explaining why some bugs are helpful (ladybugs eat other bugs, bumblebees pollinate flowers) and others are not. (Nobody had anything good to say about cockroaches.) By 5th-grade, writing topics are quite worldly: One child was eager to share his political essay, in which he waxed poetic about "the genius of Karl Rove" and despaired "the breakdown of the Republican Party." 

PS 6 has long been considered a shade more traditional than some other District 2 schools with a focus on spelling, grammar, cursive handwriting and phonics. At the same time, children may pick books that interest them from bins in their classrooms and write about topics of their own choosing. There are plenty of class discussions, lots of small group work and freedom to think outside the box. During a unit on Native American culture, one student made a diorama, another created an iMovie, and another actually carved a Birchwood canoe with his father (who came in to class to help explain how they did it).

The school has taken steps to improve the rigor of math instruction without “tracking” children into fast and slow groups. Teachers use the progressive Investigations math curriculum, which emphasizes the conceptual understanding of math, but they supplement it with other approaches, such as Singapore Math. There is also room for more self-directed projects. For example, 1st-graders learned about data collection by writing and administering their own surveys to the 5th-graders, with questions like, “Would you rather be a whale or an eagle?” or “Would you rather watch Star Wars or Harry Potter?” before collecting and analyzing the results. Math-loving children may take part in a lunchtime "math team" to prepare for the Math Olympiad national competition.

Teachers have created an accelerated math group for particularly strong 5th-graders, who may study topics more commonly mastered in 6th or 7th grade, such as the volume of rectangular prisms, ratios and rates.

Children grow vegetables on the roof garden and eco-center and learn about nutrition and the human body. They grow rock candy crystals, watch caterpillars turn into butterflies and observe the growth of silkworms. In a more challenging experiment, teams of kids had to design their own solar cookers, keeping in mind the principles of reflection, absorption and insulation. After watching a National Geographic video about heating water to kill microorganisms, children placed two thermometers in their boxes, which are partially filled with water, and aimed for a target of 65 degrees Celsius. Cooking and eating their own s'mores was a well-earned bonus.

Lauren Fontana, principal since 2006, received her master’s in education at Bank Street College, and was a Cahn Fellow at Teacher's College, Columbia University. While teacher and parents responses to school surveys are overwhelmingly positive, 25 percent of teachers said they did not receive "enough time to think carefully about, try and evaluate new ideas." Fontana and her two assistant principals Amy Santucci and Jane Galasso, say they work hard to make sure teachers get plenty of support. Assistant teachers receive professional development on topics like classroom management, guided reading and helping kids with sensory needs, Fontana said. 

SPECIAL EDUCATION: The school offers speech, hearing, occupational and physical therapy, as well as ICT team-teaching classes and SETSS (special education teacher support services). The school also provides counseling, art therapy and various support groups, such as for children whose parents are separating. Kindergarten and 1st grade teachers receive training in Reading Reform, a philosophy toward teaching phonemic awareness, based on Orton-Gillingham techniques. PS 6 aims to be flexible in how it provides extra help, whether or not a child has an Individual Education Plan, the legal document that outlines the services to which a child is entitled.

ADMISSIONS: Neighborhood school. (Clara Hemphill, May 2014 & Aimee Sabo, May 2016)

InsideStats

Click tabs above to see school stats

At a glance

Shared campus? No

This school is in its own building.

Number of Students 700

Average Daily Attendance 96%

Students at this school

Asian

  
13%

Black

  
2%

Hispanic

  
7%

White

  
75%

Free Lunch

  
6%

Special ed

  
17%

English Language Learners

  
2%

Safety & vibe

ARE KIDS
NICE?

How many teachers say bullying is a problem at school?

NA NA CITYWIDE AVERAGE

How many teachers say order and discipline are maintained in the school?

88% 81% CITYWIDE AVERAGE

ARE CLASSES BIG?

Number of students in an average kindergarten class

NA NA CITYWIDE AVERAGE

Number of students in an average fifth grade class

NA NA CITYWIDE AVERAGE

DO TEACHERS LIKE THE SCHOOL?

How many teachers say the principal is an effective manager?

36% 80% CITYWIDE AVERAGE

How many teachers would recommend this school to other parents?

NA NA CITYWIDE AVERAGE

Attendance

How many students are chronically absent?

5% 23% CITYWIDE AVERAGE

Academics

How many teachers say this school offers enough programs, classes and activities to keep students engaged?

NA NA CITYWIDE AVERAGE

How many teachers say this school does a good job teaching social-emotional skills?

NA NA CITYWIDE AVERAGE

How many teachers say this school does a good job teaching organizational and study skills?

NA NA CITYWIDE AVERAGE

Percent of 3rd, 4th & 5th graders who scored 3 or 4 on the state math exam

86% 41% CITYWIDE AVERAGE

Percent of 3rd, 4th & 5th graders who scored 3 or 4 on the state ela exam

85% 40% CITYWIDE AVERAGE

Percent of 4th graders who scored 3 or 4 on the state science exam

NA NA CITYWIDE AVERAGE

Parents

Are parents involved?

How many parents responded to the school survey?

41% 64% CITYWIDE AVERAGE

How many parents say they attended at least one pta meeting in the last school year?

NA NA CITYWIDE AVERAGE

Does the school encourage family involvement?

How many parents say they were invited to an event at the school at least 3 times in the last school year?

NA NA CITYWIDE AVERAGE

Do parents like the school?

How many parents would recommend this school to other parents?

NA NA CITYWIDE AVERAGE

Special ed & ELL

How well does this school serve students with disabilities?

Percent of self-contained students who scored 3 or 4 on the state math exam:

NA 8% CITYWIDE AVERAGE

Percent of self-contained students who scored 3 or 4 on the state ELA exam:

NA 2% CITYWIDE AVERAGE

Percent of ICT students who scored 3 or 4 on the state math exam:

39% 19% CITYWIDE AVERAGE

Percent of ICT students who scored 3 or 4 on the state ELA exam:

26% 9% CITYWIDE AVERAGE

Percent of SETSS students who scored 3 or 4 on the state math exam:

77% 17% CITYWIDE AVERAGE

Percent of SETSS students who scored 3 or 4 on the state ELA exam:

54% 9% CITYWIDE AVERAGE

How many parents say students with disabilities are included in all activities?

NA NA CITYWIDE AVERAGE

How many teachers say students with special needs are educated in the least restrictive environment appropriate?

100% 93% CITYWIDE AVERAGE

How many parents of students with ieps say this school offers a wide enough variety of services and activities for their children’s needs?

94% 86% CITYWIDE AVERAGE

How well does this school serve English language learners?

Percent of ell students who scored 3 or 4 on the state ELA exam:

NA 6% CITYWIDE AVERAGE

Percent of former ell students who scored 3 or 4 on the state ELA exam:

89% 32% CITYWIDE AVERAGE

How many teachers say this school ensures that ells receive the same curriculum as non-ells with appropriate suppports?

NA NA CITYWIDE AVERAGE

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